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About Us

Houston Arts Alliance (HAA) is the local nonprofit arts and culture agency that enhances the city’s quality of life through advancing and investing in the arts and diverse cultural programming. The work of HAA encourages Houston’s development and shapes its global reputation by fostering tourism and supporting and promoting the city’s creative economy.

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Public Art

Creating public spaces for civic and cultural use requires artists, designers, architects, and the community to collaborate. By actively fostering these partnerships, both public and private, HAA’s Civic Art + Design program initiates, manages, and maintains public artworks throughout Houston. It serves a vital role as catalyst for change that generates a culturally relevant and rich environment for residents and visitors alike.

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Folklife + Civic Engagement

Houston Arts Alliance’s Folklife + Civic Engagement program identifies and honors the artistic and cultural traditions of the city’s tremendously diverse and various communities and works to address the needs of all residents through engagement, citizen-driven initiatives, and equitable community outcomes. The Folklife program has been in existence since 2010. The addition of Civic Engagement to its portfolio was enacted through an HAA bylaws change in 2016.

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Grants

Grants are a fundamental means of promoting excellence in the creative sector. On behalf of the City of Houston, HAA awards approximately 225 grants annually to nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and individual artists through a competitive grant allocation process.

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Capacity Building

Houston Arts Alliance provides voice and leadership through its support of arts organizations and individual artists with programs and services that help build and foster a vibrant and creative community—these programs and services help to ensure that the arts professionals’ creative contributions remain a vital part of community life across Houston and the region.

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Research

Houston Arts Alliance continues to play an important role in arts and culture research projects, initiating and participating in studies that demonstrate the far-reaching impact of arts and culture on our economy and quality of life.

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Get Involved

Looking for a way to lend a hand? Investing in the arts and culture is an investment in the quality of life for all Houstonians. Join Houston Arts Alliance as a donor, member or volunteer!

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News

Houston Arts Alliance utilizes different vehicles to communicate with it diverse audiences, ranging from the city’s arts and culture community to residents to tourists. Find out more about HAA’s electronic newsletters and connect with us through social media. Our online Press Room provides resources for members of the media.

Thursday, September 28, 2017
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Wednesday, January 10, 2018
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Gemini II Conservation


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Photo courtesy of Houston Arts Alliance

Richard Lippold, Gemini II, 1965-1966. Anodized aluminum and 22k gold-plated stainless steel cables. Jesse H. Jones Hall, 615 Louisiana.
Originally commissioned by Houston Endowment

Conservator: The Richard Lippold Foundation
Lighting Contractor: Illuminations Lighting Design
Project Completion Date: August 2008 (conservation); October 2009 (lighting)
Funding Source: Percent for Art – City of Houston, Convention & Entertainment Facilities Department

The priceless, five-ton sculpture suspended in the lobby of Jones Hall was thoroughly cleaned and repaired by the Richard Lippold Foundation. Six stories of scaffolding were erected throughout the entire lobby in order for the conservator to access the array of several thousand hexagonal aluminum rods ranging from three to six feet in length. The project was carefully coordinated in conjunction with the facility’s “dark” period between performances.

The artwork lighting was upgraded using a more energy-efficient lighting system that could offer improved illumination.  An astronomical time clock was also installed and configured to turn the lights on at sundown and keep them on until 1 a.m.

July 16
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